JOSH WRITE BLOG.

JOSH WRITE BLOG.

Joshua Humphreys, comedy novelist, josh write blog

A HOARD OF MAGNIFICENCE;
AN ONLY SLIGHTLY EXAGGERATED CHRONICLE;
A FOREST REBEL'S LOGBOOK;
A WRITER'S BOOK OF LOGS.

A HOARD OF MAGNIFICENCE;
AN ONLY SLIGHTLY EXAGGERATED CHRONICLE;
A FOREST REBEL'S LOGBOOK;
A WRITER'S BOOK OF LOGS.




THE BOOK OF LOGS
is an archive of the gallivanting, the erudition, the outright foolishness—that make for
the life of a comedy novelist.










THE BOOK OF LOGS
is an archive of the gallivanting, the erudition,
the outright foolishness—that make for
the life of a comedy novelist.







Newer logs are at the top,
click [here] to fly down to the oldest,
click on any image to enlarge it
, and enjoy!

Wait, "blog" is short for Book of Logs, right?



The newest 5 Logs are at the top,
click [here] to fly down to the oldest, click on any image to enlarge it
,
and enjoy!

Wait, "blog" is short for Book of Logs, right?


GREAT CITY OF IMMORTALS


ABSOLUTELY NOT AN ADVERTISEMENT

LAI THAI


HOME


SOCIAL MEDIA

ATHENS


BANGKOK!

BANGKOK!

28th October 2019


The city, I think, to which I have the most unique relationship. (not, my relationship is more unique than anyone else’s—but rather my relationship to Bangkok is more unique than my relationship to any other city). 

The first place I ever landed in Asia! The city to which I first fled when I realised that I could be a writer and nothing else! The city that kept drawing me in, day by day, week by week—until I decided to live there for 2017, and which I quickly found supremely amenable to the way I work.

For years I thought I was an oddity, that my love for Bangkok was a defect—WHAT ABOUT EUROPE!? And the reputation that city has among most people! Ladyboys, backpackers, garbage, smog,  traffic.

But Bangkok to me is a city of temples, canals, street food, sunsets,  harmonious mayhem. It's a city in which I've set sections of 2 of my novels. And it's a city which continues to enthral and delight me.

Recently I read a book by a similarly afflicted writer (Alex Kerr), and was astounded to find my reservations in the words of another. If only I had listened to myself for the last few years, had backed my own hunch! So I've at last admitted it:

I love Bangkok, and it is supremely amenable to my work.

My 2020 is looking like: the biggest New Cavalier Reading Society I’ve ever done. A full, months-long launch of The Creative Art of Wishfulness. Writing a new Comedy Novel. And (with more information to follow) a “Stones of Bangkok” Tour.

It again makes sense for me to move to Bangkok.

And so I shall, and am doing so, in just 3 weeks' time. Where I'll begin to research and plan a Bangkok Tour in time for a November-December 2020 season...


28th October 2019


The city, I think, to which I have the most unique relationship. (not, my relationship is more unique than anyone else’s—but rather my relationship to Bangkok is more unique than my relationship to any other city). 

The first place I ever landed in Asia! The city to which I first fled when I realised that I could be a writer and nothing else! The city that kept drawing me in, day by day, week by week—until I decided to live there for 2017, and which I quickly found supremely amenable to the way I work.

For years I thought I was an oddity, that my love for Bangkok was a defect—WHAT ABOUT EUROPE!? And the reputation that city has among most people! Ladyboys, backpackers, garbage, smog,  traffic.

But Bangkok to me is a city of temples, canals, street food, sunsets,  harmonious mayhem. It's a city in which I've set sections of 2 of my novels. And it's a city which continues to enthral and delight me.

Recently I read a book by a similarly afflicted writer (Alex Kerr), and was astounded to find my reservations in the words of another. If only I had listened to myself for the last few years, had backed my own hunch! So I've at last admitted it:

I love Bangkok, and it is supremely amenable to my work.

My 2020 is looking like: the biggest New Cavalier Reading Society I’ve ever done. A full, months-long launch of The Creative Art of Wishfulness. Writing a new Comedy Novel. And (with more information to follow) a “Stones of Bangkok” Tour.

It again makes sense for me to move to Bangkok.

And so I shall, and am doing so, in just 3 weeks' time. Where I'll begin to research and plan a Bangkok Tour in time for a November-December 2020 season...



LAI THAI

26th October 2019


A couple of months ago I stumbled upon Thai Cremation Books.

A custom unique to Thailand and about a century old, they're booklets created for a cremation ceremony, which contain a short biography of the deceased, their favourite (otherwise secret) recipes, their most cherished Buddhist scriptures, photographs, and anything else they wished to pass on before dying.

Then last week I stumbled upon a library of 3,000 of these Cremation Books!

I've been obsessed with Thai art and design since I first lived in Bangkok, all the way back in 2015. So much so that the cover of Exquisite Hours is Thai-inspired and The Creative Art of Wishfulness opens there.

The patterns, with the flames and the fractals and the snake-heads, are called “Lai Thai”, which just means “Thai Patterns”, but they're completely unique in world art.

Largely derived from the sculpted motifs at Angkor Wat, they now have a life of their own and are EVERYWHERE in Thailand—from menus to temple doors—and are Thailand’s contribution to the meagre beauty of the human world.

For the last week I've been scouring this library of 3,000 cremation books for Lai Thai designs, and have compiled over a dozen 5” x 8” pages like the one you see to your right. 

I don’t know where or when I’ll use them. But for now, they are just lovely to look at.
(And I acknowledge that the image I've included looks like a page out of a tattoo-design book.)

But that's Lai Thai—an aesthetic enthusiasm of mine that's been on the slow-burn for a while and has just received a splash of rocket fuel.

lai thai, thai cremation books, the stones of bangkok, kranok, bangkok

LAI THAI

26th October 2019


A couple of months ago I stumbled upon Thai Cremation Books.

A custom unique to Thailand and about a century old, they're booklets created for a cremation ceremony, which contain a short biography of the deceased, their favourite (otherwise secret) recipes, their most cherished Buddhist scriptures, photographs, and anything else they wished to pass on before dying.

Then last week I stumbled upon a library of 3,000 of these Cremation Books!

I've been obsessed with Thai art and design since I first lived in Bangkok, all the way back in 2015. So much so that the cover of Exquisite Hours is Thai-inspired and The Creative Art of Wishfulness opens there.

The patterns, with the flames and the fractals and the snake-heads, are called “Lai Thai”, which just means “Thai Patterns”, but they're completely unique in world art.

Largely derived from the sculpted motifs at Angkor Wat, they now have a life of their own and are EVERYWHERE in Thailand—from menus to temple doors—and are Thailand’s contribution to the meagre beauty of the human world.

For the last week I've been scouring this library of 3,000 cremation books for Lai Thai designs, and have compiled over a dozen 5” x 8” pages like the one you see to your right. 

I don’t know where or when I’ll use them. But for now, they are just lovely to look at.
(And I acknowledge that the image I've included looks like a page out of a tattoo-design book.)

But that's Lai Thai—an aesthetic enthusiasm of mine that's been on the slow-burn for a while and has just received a splash of rocket fuel.


A GOOD DEED

A GOOD DEED

24th October 2019


In the past when I’ve launched a novel I’ve spent months and months promoting it through excerpts, authorly silliness, and reader reviews.

But since I only and briefly pre-launched The Creative Art of Wishfulness (its full launch is in Feb 2020), I haven’t gotten very much feedback about my latest Comedy Novel.

And so I’m presently wondering—have you read it?!? Did you enjoy it? What did it lack? In what did it abound? Was it, above all, funny?!??

Direct feedback from readers is one of the great privileges of being an independent author, and if you did like The Creative Art of Wishfulness, if Alexandra Wishart’s bullcrap or Godfrey Lackland’s tribulations made you laugh—there’s one huge favour you might be able to do for this independent author….

An Amazon or Goodreads review!

As short or as long as you’d like, if you could find 5 minutes out of your week to head to Amazon or Goodreads, and leave an honest review and rating of the book, it would be immensely helpful to me as an author! Both as feedback for writing my next book, AND for convincing the not-yet-reader of Comedy Novels about their hilarious literary worth!

I'll even put the direct your-review-is-one-click-away links right here:–

A review of The Creative Art of Wishfulness; Amazon or Goodreads; your very kind deed for the week??

24th October 2019


In the past when I’ve launched a novel I’ve spent months and months promoting it through excerpts, authorly silliness, and reader reviews.

But since I only and briefly pre-launched The Creative Art of Wishfulness (its full launch is in Feb 2020), I haven’t gotten very much feedback about my latest Comedy Novel.

And so I’m presently wondering—have you read it?!? Did you enjoy it? What did it lack? In what did it abound? Was it, above all, funny?!??

Direct feedback from readers is one of the great privileges of being an independent author, and if you did like The Creative Art of Wishfulness, if Alexandra Wishart’s bullcrap or Godfrey Lackland’s tribulations made you laugh—there’s one huge favour you might be able to do for this independent author….

An Amazon or Goodreads review!

As short or as long as you’d like, if you could find 5 minutes out of your week to head to Amazon or Goodreads, and leave an honest review and rating of the book, it would be immensely helpful to me as an author! Both as feedback for writing my next book, AND for convincing the not-yet-reader of Comedy Novels about their hilarious literary worth!

I'll even put the direct your-review-is-one-click-away links right here:–

A review of The Creative Art of Wishfulness; Amazon or Goodreads; your very kind deed for the week??


ATHENS

23rd October, 2019


Athens is truly an incredible place, but for most of my trip to Greece, I was hampered by one thought:

I don’t really enjoy travel anymore.

Or more specifically, the enthusiasm I used to have for it—for discovering new places, new cultures, new arts, new backstreets, new islands, new people—has dwindled to the point of negligibility.

Partly this is due to the impending sense of doom  the world apparently wants to foist onto me. The feeling that the world’s going to end at any moment, that it already has ended. Europe’s population is declining, millions are arriving from Africa. What’s the point in reading a 3000-year-old play, or looking at an old church? The culture that created it, the people who worshipped in it, will be gone soon—are gone—never existed!

Partly it is due to the fact that I’ve travelled almost constantly for the last 4 and a half years. I’ve not spent more than 3 consecutive months in one place since 2014. Evelyn Waugh said, “At the age of 35 one needs to go to the moon, or some such place, to recapture the excitement with which one first landed at Calais.”

This is about how I feel about travel now.

I land in Athens and think, “Its temples do not shimmer as Bangkok’s do.” In Bangkok I think, “The canals are not clear, as Venice’s are.” I land in Venice and think, “It isn't as varied as London.” I land in London and think, “It has not one temple.” And I land in India and think, “Get me the fuck out of India.”

So the whirligig goes on, and the excitement I once got from racing around Venice for weeks on end can now nowhere be found.

I guess that’s part of the great dissipation of youth, which I do seem to have already stretched beyond its natural limit.

Is there anywhere still worth discovering? Or does wider experience necessarily lead to narrower excitement?


ATHENS

23rd October, 2019


Athens is truly an incredible place, but for most of my trip to Greece, I was hampered by one thought:

I don’t really enjoy travel anymore.

Or more specifically, the enthusiasm I used to have for it—for discovering new places, new cultures, new arts, new backstreets, new islands, new people—has dwindled to the point of negligibility.

Partly this is due to the impending sense of doom  the world apparently wants to foist onto me. The feeling that the world’s going to end at any moment, that it already has ended. Europe’s population is declining, millions are arriving from Africa. What’s the point in reading a 3000-year-old play, or looking at an old church? The culture that created it, the people who worshipped in it, will be gone soon—are gone—never existed!

Partly it is due to the fact that I’ve travelled almost constantly for the last 4 and a half years. I’ve not spent more than 3 consecutive months in one place since 2014. Evelyn Waugh said, “At the age of 35 one needs to go to the moon, or some such place, to recapture the excitement with which one first landed at Calais.”

This is about how I feel about travel now.

I land in Athens and think, “Its temples do not shimmer as Bangkok’s do.” In Bangkok I think, “The canals are not clear, as Venice’s are.” I land in Venice and think, “It isn't as varied as London.” I land in London and think, “It has not one temple.” And I land in India and think, “Get me the fuck out of India.”

So the whirligig goes on, and the excitement I once got from racing around Venice for weeks on end can now nowhere be found.

I guess that’s part of the great dissipation of youth, which I do seem to have already stretched beyond its natural limit.

Is there anywhere still worth discovering? Or does wider experience necessarily lead to narrower excitement?



SFAKIA

SFAKIA

20th October, 2019


A week in Sfakia, a province of southwestern Crete, famous for its independence, its stubborness, its brutality.

The only place in Crete never to have submitted to the Venetians or the Turks, once I heard about it I couldn’t not go. Though a Greek friend warned me—watch your jokes with that smart mouth, they still practise blood-feuds in Sfakia.

Well, after walking (I really take issue with the word hiking. It’s literally just walking with unnecessary  shit) after walking the canyon through which Evelyn Waugh in 1941 helped evacuate the Allied army, I heard tell of another, better, gorge, and went and WALKED that one too. The WALK started at Aradena, an abandoned village, left to crumble in the 1950s over a blood feud which began over a goat-bell.

Yes, you read correctly. A blood feud over a goat bell escalated so seriously they had to abandon an entire village. Goddam villagers. After coming across several Sfakian men, I can see how this might happen. They have zero sense of humour—didn't laugh at ONE of my jokes about their beards, their baggy shirts, their country's economy. 

But Crete is absolutely a land of goats. They're everywhere and they stink. And it has very wild and bandit-friendly places. And yoga seems somehow to have infiltrated the place. So as I was WALKING around Sfakia for 3 days I realised… a sequel to Exquisite Hours might very aptly take place here. With Anaïs Spencer lying to elderly German tourists and Hector Grieve a bandit in the mountains and Alexandra Wishart running a Cretan wellness retreat.

It could be called Goatland.

And just like that, 2021’s Comedy Novel has its first sketches made. Because of blood-feuds in Sfakia...

As a side note, what the fuck is honey? Is it bee piss? Bee spit? I know they take pollen back to their hives and do something with it. Do they have sex with it? Honey's not bee sperm is it? That's gross.

20th October, 2019


A week in Sfakia, a province of southwestern Crete, famous for its independence, its stubborness, its brutality.

The only place in Crete never to have submitted to the Venetians or the Turks, once I heard about it I couldn’t not go. Though a Greek friend warned me—watch your jokes with that smart mouth, they still practise blood-feuds in Sfakia.

Well, after walking (I really take issue with the word hiking. It’s literally just walking with unnecessary  shit) after walking the canyon through which Evelyn Waugh in 1941 helped evacuate the Allied army, I heard tell of another, better, gorge, and went and WALKED that one too. The WALK started at Aradena, an abandoned village, left to crumble in the 1950s over a blood feud which began over a goat-bell.

Yes, you read correctly. A blood feud over a goat bell escalated so seriously they had to abandon an entire village. Goddam villagers. After coming across several Sfakian men, I can see how this might happen. They have zero sense of humour—didn't laugh at ONE of my jokes about their beards, their baggy shirts, their country's economy. 

But Crete is absolutely a land of goats. They're everywhere and they stink. And it has very wild and bandit-friendly places. And yoga seems somehow to have infiltrated the place. So as I was WALKING around Sfakia for 3 days I realised… a sequel to Exquisite Hours might very aptly take place here. With Anaïs Spencer lying to elderly German tourists and Hector Grieve a bandit in the mountains and Alexandra Wishart running a Cretan wellness retreat.

It could be called Goatland.

And just like that, 2021’s Comedy Novel has its first sketches made. Because of blood-feuds in Sfakia...

As a side note, what the fuck is honey? Is it bee piss? Bee spit? I know they take pollen back to their hives and do something with it. Do they have sex with it? Honey's not bee sperm is it? That's gross.




(OCCASIONALLY CALLED, DUE TO A PROCLIVITY FOR 

DANIEL DAY LEWIS IMPERSONATIONS, "THE FIST")

JOSH WRITE BLOG.

Because social media can go cry in its totalitarian pie,
I present to you a blog, of sorts.

Giving you more insight into the erudition, gallivanting,
& outright foolishness that go into what I do,
The Fist is to be an opinionated chronicle and a humble collection of magnificence.

The newest points are at the top,
click [here] to fly all the way down to the oldest,
click on images to enlarge them, and enjoy!

And remember...

"Each of the 5 points is a finger.
When I close my hand it becomes a fist
."

    JOSH WRITE BOOK.

WAXED  EXCEEDING  MIGHTY

Adam Athelstan grows & sells — and sings to — very rare flowers.

My first novel,
& a delightful one at that.

joshua humphreys, exquisite hours, grieve, melbourne, australian, comedy novel

GRIEVE

Hector Grieve was once
the angriest young man
in the world.

He is about to become once again... the angriest young man in the world.

comedy, novel, joshua, humphreys, anais, spencer, wanderlust, writer, melbourne, venice, bangkok, hilarious, melbourne, shakespeare

TO SAVE A
FOREST
VIRGIN

My new & debut play is
Shakespeare meets
Sex and the City meets the Comedy Novel...

WAXED  EXCEEDING  MIGHTY

Adam Athelstan grows & sells — and sings to —
very rare flowers.

My first novel,
& a delightful one at that.

joshua humphreys, exquisite hours, grieve, melbourne, australian, comedy novel

GRIEVE

Hector Grieve was once
the angriest young man
in the world.

He is about to become once again... the angriest young man in the world.

THE
NEW  CAVALIER
READING  SOCIETY

A year-long adventure through
3000 years of culture,
you'll discuss humanity's most profound questions with a whole society
of exuberant cavaliers—
and have a novelist as your tutor...

comedy, novel, joshua, humphreys, anais, spencer, wanderlust, writer, melbourne, venice, bangkok, hilarious,

EXQUISITE HOURS

Anais Spencer travels the world lying to men...

The book that launched a career,
(& currently in pre-production as a movie.)

comedy, novel, joshua, humphreys, anais, spencer, wanderlust, writer, melbourne, venice, bangkok, hilarious, melbourne, shakespeare

TO SAVE A
FOREST
VIRGIN

My new & debut play is
Shakespeare meets
Sex and the City meets the Comedy Novel...

comedy, novel, joshua, humphreys, anais, spencer, wanderlust, writer, melbourne, venice, bangkok, hilarious,

EXQUISITE HOURS

Anais Spencer travels the world
lying to men...

The book that launched a career,
(& currently in pre-production as a movie.)

THE
NEW  CAVALIER
READING  SOCIETY

A year-long adventure through
3000 years of culture,
you'll discuss humanity's most profound questions with a whole society of exuberant cavaliers—
and have a novelist as your tutor...

JOSH WRITE BOOK.